Psalm 5: A Morning Devotional Prayer or Something Else?

The KJV rendering of Psalm 5:3 can give one the impression that this is a prayer of general devotion to be recited in the morning. However, a careful reading of the psalm shows that quite a bit more is going on here.

Principles For Reading Hebrew Parallelism in English

To get the most out of Hebrew poetry when reading it in English: (1) look for subtle comparison and contrast, not bland repetition; (2) look for layered parallels; (3) look for movement in the parallels. Want to know more? Read this article.

The Challenge and Importance of the OT’s Prophetic Poetry

Reading the poetic portions of the Old Testament in English, especially in the Prophets, can be challenging. But the fact is that the more familiar one becomes with the poetic sections of the Prophets, the more one sees that they are absolutely, vitally central to the NT. In the end, the way to make OT poetry interesting and understandable is not by retreating from it but by studying it even more intensely using all the imaginative and scholarly resources at your disposal.

God’s Unreasonable Love, Our Unreasonable Faith – An Easter Sermon

God’s love for us is unreasonable – it is not based on reasons but merely on God’s sovereign decision. The resurrection of Jesus is also unreasonable in that it lies beyond the realm of reason either to prove or disprove. This is why it is the perfect demonstration of God’s unreasonable love. It is also why our unreasonable faith in the resurrection is the perfect human response to God’s unreasonable love.

May Your Children Be Like Isaac: Reading Isaac on the Autistic Spectrum

Isaac’s behavior and characterization in Genesis has long struck commentators as odd for his passivity, repetitiveness, and imitativeness of his father Abraham. Interestingly, much of the peculiarity of Isaac’s behavior fits the profile of a high functioning autistic individual.

The Book of Job and the Problem of Suffering

The biblical Book of Job addresses the problem of suffering in a way that is superior to the way moderns tend to talk about it in three ways: (1) it never questions God’s sovereignty; (2) it recognizes our human tendency to assume that God’s righteous judgments will be intelligible and relatively immediate; (3) it emphasizes the role of dialogue (including especially dialogue with God) as the path of resolution for the problem of suffering.

Towards a “Definition” of Holiness

The biblical concept of “holiness” is not simply “doing good”, but it is the context that defines what is good and infuses our doing good with divine significance. The relationship between holiness and what the world sees as “good” is complex: sometimes they coincide, sometimes they are askew, and sometimes they come directly into conflict.

The Problem of Good

Inasmuch as non-Christians do good, they are working with Christians in doing the will of the Lord Jesus. Non-Christian goodness does not supplant or negate the lordship of Christ. It confirms and demonstrates it.

The Enduring Relevance of the Church

The relevance of the Church is not dependent on its ability to strategically adjust its message to pertain to what the world is concerned about. Rather, the Church only needs to concern itself with being relevant to ground of all reality, God himself in Christ. Inasmuch as it does this, what the Church has to say is by definition the most relevant thing that can be said.